Spiga


Trau·ma  Junk· ie  ( 'trau-m&  'j&[ng]-kE) n. Slang
  1. One who has an insatiable interest, devotion or addiction to responding and assisting people with serious injury or shock to the body, as from violence or an accident.

EMS Today, Part II: All about the memories

(To read the first part of this post, click here.)


As I sit down to write part two of my experiences at EMS Today, I realize that I have a lot to say, but it is difficult to put my emotions and feelings to words. As I have been a blogger for almost two years now, that's not something I'm used to dealing with.

I tried for a while to figure out why I was having this dilemna...why I couldn't share the sheer epicness with my readers. Then it hit me.

For the past few years, I've made friends with some of the coolest people I know. Friendships, networking, and connections were all made via blogging, Twitter, or other forms of social media. Any time I found myself struggling with school, I reached out to this amazing community of people. People...that I've never met. Until I was in Baltimore.

People my own age, who are just as passionate about EMS as I am:
And being able to sit face-to-face with those who inspire us:
(Meris, Justin, and Mark)

These were people from all different age groups, different walks of life, different beliefs, and different outlooks. As friends have, we've probably all had outs with each other from time to time. But, we share one thing in common:
(L to R: Kelly Grayson, Mike Ward [@Fossilmedic], Mark Glencourse, Stephanie, Epijunky)
From states, and even entire countries apart, we share a love for EMS. A tie that binds us, if you will.

So, looking back on EMS Today 2010, what was the best part of entire gathering? There is no one thing that made it so great. It wasn't simply seeing all the latest products relevant to the field at the exhibit hall, it wasn't just what I learned as a new EMT student and very much a rookie in EMS, nor was it solely being able to put a name and face to someone's Twitter handle.

It was all about the memories. Being able to look back almost two weeks later and say,
"Holy crap, I was a part of THAT?"

Realistically, I should be able to look back and say I made a lot of new friends and colleagues. But the fact of the matter is, we already knew each other. And in meeting most of these people for the first time, albeit an amazing experience, I feel as though I had known them all already.

Therefore, I can't say I made new friends. But the memories? Those will last a lifetime.

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