Spiga


Trau·ma  Junk· ie  ( 'trau-m&  'j&[ng]-kE) n. Slang
  1. One who has an insatiable interest, devotion or addiction to responding and assisting people with serious injury or shock to the body, as from violence or an accident.

Feeling more like an RT student every day...

I'm a hands-on learner, so as much as I hate the fact that I have a 4 hour long lab on Friday afternoon, it really helps me to supplement all of the information throw at me all week long.

As I've said before, I've been a CNA for the past two years. So up until this past week, all of the stuff we've learned is pretty familiar to me. I'm glad that we finally covered something that made me feel like an RT student.

That's right. This week we've been covering bedside assessment of the patient. Since I want to work in ICU or a Trauma ER after graduation, I really need to be able to master my assessment skills. We learned how to assess LOC, check for cyanosis or clubbing, assess capillary refill time, AP diameter, check manual blood pressures (I was glad I already knew how to do this, because it took me weeks to learn), and my favorite-- how to auscultate lung sounds. I don't know what it is, it could be because I'm a nerd, but I've always wanted to be able to assess lung sounds everytime I've seen a nurse or RT do it at the hospital. I was able to distinguish between stridor, rales, expiratory wheezing, and of course normal (clear) breath sounds. I know this probably isn't a big deal, but I was never able to hear anything before.

We also learned how to distinguish between breathing patterns such as Cheyne-Stokes, Biot's (cluster) respirations, Kussmaul's, and so on. I never knew there were so many different breathing patterns, I thought I was smart for being able to chart "respirations regular, even and unlabored." lol. Now I know that means the patient is exhibiting a eupneic breathing pattern.

I've done a lot more studying this week, which is why my blogs are so few and far between compared to every day or two like they used to be. Who would have known that studying five hours a day isn't enough? Then again, I want to do what I can to succeed.


I'd like to end this with a bit of RT humor. We had a meeting today to design shirts for our program. Some of the sayings had me cracking up. Here were a few of my favorites:

1. Go forth and nebulize
2. Don't worry. We'll get rid of that SOB for you.
3. Respiratory Therapists: A Source of Inspiration
4. RT Students-- Clubbing isn't just a night on the town
5. SHUNT HAPPENS

Anyways, I hope someone else can find those as funny as I did. I want to thank everyone for voting in my poll; it will really help me to change up my blog a bit and post more about what you guys are interested in reading.

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